Anyone who only pays taxes and is not a citizen is a “guest worker” and has nothing to do with our political representation.

Anyone who only pays taxes and is not a citizen is a “guest worker” and has nothing to do with our political representation.

Oct. 2015 09:18

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The right to vote should not depend on citizenship but on tax revenue. Wherever I pay taxes, I can also have a say and whoever doesn’t pay taxes doesn’t.

christian95 Wed., Oct. 07. 2015 09:53

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The right to vote is the sole right of a citizen. Anyone who is not a citizen has no right to vote! Anyone who only pays taxes and is not a citizen is a “guest worker” and has nothing to do with our political representation. (A tourist also pays taxes when he comes to Vienna)

Querdenker62 Wed., 07. Oct. 2015 10:33

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This is of course about income tax. Whoever pays into the system should also determine what is done with the money. Those who only take (welfare) should not be allowed to have a say.

Tavington Wed. Oct. 7, 2015 10:41 am

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only local taxpayers should choose. then spö would only reach 0.5%. if any.

christian95 Wed., Oct. 07. 2015 11:30

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@ Querdenker62Why so petty? EVERYONE who is in the country on election day should be allowed to vote. Why, instead of citizenship, create new hurdles with income tax? So we no longer need voter lists. In the computer age you can walk past a polling station and vote immediately …..

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dageier Wed., Oct. 07. 2015 09:13

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haha. Could just be a joke, right? You can only come up with an idea like this as a comedian … It doesn’t take long and they come up with the idea that every citizen of the world without an Austrian residence may also vote … well, there would be a few more voting cards accept and not constantly demand ..

christian95 Wed., Oct. 07. 2015 09:41

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It is getting more and more stupid! is not allowed to vote in Vienna. But if someone from Syria, possibly also illegally, should be allowed to vote ????

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andi56 Wed., Oct. 07. 2015 07:59

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Yes, if strangers are allowed to vote in foreign countries – that can’t be the content or – turn on your brains – Austrian citizenship is easy to get and if you don’t want it or there are reasons that you don’t get it, you can’t vote that easy is that. Period

gustigusti Wed., Oct. 07. 2015 7:49 am

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How does one come up with such an idea, even to begin with, to think this madness? A new low has now been reached, dear news. Of course, a non-Austrian is not allowed to vote, how can that even be discussed? That is the last right that the Austrians still hold. Foreigners can enter our job market, our community housing and in

gustigusti Wed., Oct. 07. 2015 07:50

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our social (or should I say welfare) system. No, no and no again, not today, not in the future, never!

christian95 Wed., Oct. 07. 2015 09:42

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100% correct; that’s how I see it. “We” will soon have a choice.

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Household energy in Austria was 2.7 percent cheaper in February than a year before. This emerges from the energy price index (EPI) calculated by the Austrian Energy Agency. Compared to the previous month of January, household energy prices in February were 0.1 percent higher.

For comparison: The consumer price index (CPI) rose by 1.5 percent compared to February 2013, i.e. within a year, and increased by 0.2 percent compared to January 2014.

Fuel and heating oil are cheaper

Fuel and heating oil in particular became significantly cheaper year-on-year. Eurosuper cost 6.4 percent less in February than a year before, diesel was 4.5 percent cheaper. Heating oil was 6.7 percent cheaper within a year.

More expensive: solid fuels

Solid fuels, on the other hand, rose quite strongly compared to the previous year, namely by 5.2 percent. The price of firewood rose by 4.3 percent, the price for wood briquettes by 6.2 percent.to kill a mockingbird full story Wood pellets were even 11.3 percent more expensive in February than a year before.

The gas price fell by 0.5 percent compared to the previous year, while the price of electricity rose by 0.2 percent; District heating was 1.2 percent more expensive in February than a year earlier.

Compared to the previous month of January, Eurosuper cost 0.3 percent more in February, the diesel price remained stable. Heating oil prices rose marginally by 0.1 percent on a monthly basis. Solid fuels rose by 0.4 percent, firewood by 0.6 percent and wood briquettes by 0.1 percent. Wood pellets were 0.7 percent cheaper in February than in January. Gas and electricity cost the same in February as in January, while district heating was 0.9 percent more expensive.

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christian95 Mon., March 24th. 2014 10:57

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Cheap fuel is not “fair” as the SPÖ calls it, the ÖVP says it is “unecological”. ….

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Airline mergers have concentrated more than 70 percent of US passenger flights with four major carriers. However, budget airlines are still influential in terms of fares. A recent survey by Hopper shows that offers from airlines such as JetBlu, Spirit, Frontier, Alaska and Southwest on an existing connection lead to the average price of all providers falling by up to 67 percent.

This is good news for travelers. However, experts emphasize that the most popular routes are still dominated by the four largest providers United, Delta, Southwest and the soon-to-be-joined American Airlines and US Airways. “Even if the low-cost airlines take a new route, the tariffs only drop temporarily. It doesn’t stay that way forever,” emphasizes FareCompare co-founder Rick Seaney.

Hopper wanted to know what happened when low-cost airlines began flying to around 150 new destinations. The website analyzed the tariffs three months before and three months after the start. When JetBlue hit a market, tariffs fell the most – by 67 percent. JetBlue started the connection from Boston to Philadelphia in May 2013. As a result, the tariffs of all providers on this route fell on average from 356 dollars to 118 dollars.

Competition stimulates business

According to Patrick Surry, the senior scientist at Hopper, prices can be cut very sharply when entering the market. Spirit and Frontier Airlines were able to reduce passenger tariffs by an average of 30 percent in a new market, according to the study. Although prices later slowly rise again, according to Seaney they no longer reach the original level. “The more competition there is, the better it is for consumers.”

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In surveys, the FPÖ is higher than ever. Pollsters are not even ruling out first place in today’s municipal council election in Vienna. And although a mayor Strache is highly unlikely – possible coalition partners have already ruled out cooperation – says Anton Pelinka: “The scenario is more realistic than ever. With the ÖVP or an SPÖ without Häupl, blue government participation would be conceivable.” The political scientist, who is known for his criticism of the FPÖ, says: “The identity of Vienna is not only determined by the town hall. But they could leave blue footprints.” What they might look like can be seen from the blue strategy papers of the last few months. An election campaign document published in June also mentions specific budget requirements for the blue vision.

+++ News.at will report live from the Vienna election from 4 p.m.! In the live ticker you will find all the important information about voting and you can join the discussion. All information, results and comments about the election can be found at

www.news.at/wienwahl.

+++

Social: a real Viennese does not go begging

Vienna should become more beautiful, more liveable, safer and more just “if the Blues co-rule. That is what Anton Mahdalik, state party secretary and press chief of the Vienna FPÖ” says. This should be achieved through changes in social policy, for example.

“400,000 people in Vienna live in poverty or on the poverty line, 100,000 children are affected,” club boss Johann Gudenus sent out just a month ago. The liberal answer to this: changes in the minimum income.

Anyone who earns less than 827 euros a month in Vienna receives the difference as a minimum income. For couples it is 620 euros per person. Anyone who earns nothing at all and also demonstrably does not have any other assets receives the full amount. Not only Austrians, but also non-Austrians are entitled to this, provided they have been lawfully living here for at least five years. And that is exactly what is a thorn in the side of the FPÖ. In Vienna, a third of the minimum income recipients do not have an Austrian passport. However, around 80 percent of them do not receive the full amount, but rather supplement their income with the minimum income to the subsistence level.

© GEORG HOCHMUTH / APA / picturedesk.com Emergency sleeping places, drug counseling, beggars: “Not in the middle of the city”

If the FPÖ has its way, immigrants should no longer receive any minimum income in the future. The courts would have to clarify whether this is constitutional. How this would change the city can already be estimated today. “Poor non-Austrians can only afford an apartment in a few parts of the city,” says poverty expert Martin Schenk from the Diakonie. “Poverty would then be concentrated in these parts of the city. Ghettos would emerge that Vienna is currently not familiar with.” A downward spiral would be set in motion: “In poor areas the schools are worse, people get sick more often and crime is higher,” says Schenk.

Other FPÖ plans could also favor the formation of a ghetto. In certain regions – in the city center, in front of the town hall, at the Schottentor, on Karlsplatz and on Mariahilfer Straße – begging should become illegal if the blues are allowed to rule. “It’s not a pretty sight for tourists, but annoying for Viennese,” says Anton Mahdalik.

The FPÖ does not want to see the homeless or drug addicts “in the middle of the city in the immediate vicinity of numerous schools and kindergartens”. Last November, the blue city councilor David Lasar mobilized with this argument against a drug counseling center on Alsergrund, this year in July Dagmar Belakowitsch-Jenewein, member of the National Council, against an emergency shelter in Ottakring.

Martin Schenk criticizes that this does not solve social problems. Limiting the minimum income to citizens reminds him of the racist apartheid system in South Africa. “People without an Austrian passport would still have all duties. They could live and work here and would have to pay taxes, but they would be excluded from the social system.”

The FPÖ counters this by saying that it would introduce its own social system for non-Austrians. They should then only get what they pay in. Paradoxically, immigrants of all people could benefit from it. Because, according to a study by the Ministry of Social Affairs, this group in particular pays more into the social system than it gets out of it. A separate pot for non-citizens could therefore come at the expense of those people who are particularly important to the FPÖ: the Austrians.

Living: The community housing sham

Vienna is growing and will continue to do so in the years to come. The population will increase by 20,000 to 25,000 people every year in the future. Heinz-Christian Strache therefore promises, should he become mayor, to have 5,000 new municipal apartments and 5,000 other subsidized apartments built every year. How this building offensive should be financed is unclear. With this announcement, Strache rivals the Red Vienna of the interwar period. At that time, a total of 64,000 communal apartments were built in the eleven years between 1923 and 1934. In the 1960s, an average of 9,000 new community apartments were built each year.

© Harald Jahn / picturedesk.com The symbol of the Vienna FPÖ is to become a blue trademark

The last community building to date was built in 2004. Because municipal buildings are subject to special allocation modalities and are very costly, the city shifted its housing budget towards non-profit cooperatives. There were no longer any new community apartments, but instead subsidized rental apartments. It often doesn’t make a big difference to tenants. The rents are slightly higher in subsidized housing, but so is the standard of living. For the city, municipal housing makes sense in the long term: “The investment costs are higher, but municipal buildings remain the property of the city,” says Michael Klein from the Institute for Architecture at the Vienna University of Technology.

Incidentally, there was no less construction due to the shift to non-profit property developers. In 2014, 7,273 new subsidized apartments were moved into. This year there should be a similar number. The 10,000 promised apartments of a blue city government would – if they can be financed – make a certain difference. The FPÖ also wishes: “There should only be community apartments for Austrians,” says Mahdalik. This was the case in the past until an EU directive came into force in 2006 that made this practice illegal. Even a mayor Strache could not disregard this.

Felt: Our money for our people

© Deutsch Gerhard / KURIER / picturedesk.com Goodbye City School Council Vice President: Maximilian Krauss is now running for fourth place on the list of the Vienna FPÖ

A strategy paper of the Vienna FPÖ from November sharply criticized the common Viennese practice of outsourcing municipal tasks to subsidiaries: “The Viennese SPÖ misused these privatized companies as a vehicle to disguise financial flows and debts and at the same time to provide minions with top jobs.” Strache also accuses the Greens of post haggling in the same paper.

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